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XIV. No. 90

Sunday, January 2, 1921

Price 25 Cents

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The Cold Shoulder and the Haughty Stare—

Really he was the college football hero, but in her presence he was a frozen worm!

Mother was a social climber who had taught "the snob" to raise her shoulder at persons like waiters and our hero certainly was a waiter!

But she had a lesson coming to her and she got it in that laugh- stocked comedy of genuine American youth and love and college life:

"THE SNOB"

Jl Realart Star Franchise Picture Featuring Wanda Hawley.

It gets you, this picture, like the three-long-'rahs-and-a-tiger at a football game. And it stirs something deeper than just enthusiasm over the game it makes you mighty proud to be an American in America, where snobbery just can't get by That's the idea! ' The Snob, ' ' adapted from a story by William J. Neidig, is as A merican as the Statue of Liberty.

It will shake your theatre roof with cheers, cent entertainment.

Directed by Sam Wood

It is exactly 100 per

Photoplay by Alice Eyton

Realart Pictures Corporation, 469 Fifth Avenue, New York

7/fePKOCMIZED AUTHORITY

Vol. XIV No. 90 Sunday, Jan. 2, 1921 Price 25c.

Copyright 1920, Wid's Film and Film Folks, Inc.

Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., New York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS AND FILM FOLKS, INC.

F. C. ("Wid") Gunning, President and Treasurer; Joseph Dannenberg, Vice-President and Editor; J. ' W. Alicoate, Secretary and Business Manager.

Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, at the post office at New York, N. Y., under the Act of March 3. 1879.

Terms (Postage free), United States, Outside of Greater New York,

$10.00 one year; 6 months, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, $15.00.

Subscribers should remit with order.

Address all communications to

WID'S DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., ftew York, N. Y.

Telephone, Vanderbilt 4551-4552-5558.

Hollywood, California: Editorial and Business Offices, 6411 Hollywood Boulevard. Phone, Hollywood 1603.

London Representative : W. A. Williamson, Kinematograph Weekly, 85 Long Acre, London, W. C. 2.

Paris Representative: Le Film, 144 Rue Montmartre.

Features Reviewed

Charles Ray in NINETEEN AND PHYLLIS

First National Page 2

TO PLEASE ONE WOMAN Lois Weber Prod. Paramount Page 3

June Caprice and George B. Seitz in

ROGUES AND ROMANCE Pathe Page 7

Billie Burke in ... . THE FRISKY MRS. JOHNSON Paramount Page 9

Harry Carey in HEARTS UP

Universal Page 1 1

Buck Jones in TWO MOONS

Fox Page 13

Wanda Hawley in HER BELOVED VILLAIN

Realart Page 14

Peggy Hyland in THE PRICE OF SILENCE

Sunrise Pictures Corp. State Rights. . . .Page 19 Madge Kennedy in

THE GIRL WITH THE JAZZ HEART

Goldwyn Page 21

THE HUNDREDTH CHANCE

Stoll Film— Pathe Page 23

Blanche Sweet in THAT GIRL MONTANA

Jesse D. Hampton Prod. Pathe Page 24

Eva Novak in : THE TORRENT

Universal Page 25

Short Reels h Page 33

News ot the Week in Headlines

Monday

"Passion" nets $100,000 in two weeks at the Capitol, New York.

Joseph Conrad, English author to write original stories for Paramount.

American Film Co. of Chicago to state right films made by Chicago Tribune in Ireland.

Tuesday

"Life" to be produced. Ashley Miller interested.

\\ algreene Distributing to release "What of Tomor- row," made by Community M. P. Bureau.

Perry Plays, Inc., to make four a year. Robert Z. Leonard to make the first.

Wednesday

German U. F. A. and Decla Bioscop merge. Ben Blumenthal signs Ernest Lubitsch, director of

"Passion."

W. A. Steffes, M. P. T. O. states producers have agreed to abolish advance deposits and adopt uniform con- tracts.

Associated Prod, sell Australian rights to Australasian Films, Ltd.

A. M. P. A. to hold gridiron dinner in February.

Thursday

Secretary of Lord's Day Alliance threatens action unless Pathe eliminates certain scenes in Pathe News No. 101.

Ontario Ceasor Board appointed. No film man on it.

Irish films to have two weeks' engagement at Lexing- ton theater, N. Y.

Hoover committee arranging special stunts to raise funds.

Friday

Associated Producers and United Artists reported in possible merger.

Dustin Farrium reported signed by Harry Sherman.

1,500 expected to attend theater owners hall at Aster. Xew York, on Jan. 5.

Robertson Cole buys "One Man in a Million."

Saturday

Saturday, New Year's Day. there was no issue of this publication.

'Pardoning the bad is injuring the good"— Benjamin Franklin.

tMA

DAILY

Sunday, January 2, 1921

Charles Ray Pleasing as Usual in Role a Little Different

Arthur S. Kane presents Charles Ray in "NINETEEN AND PHYLLIS" Ray First National

DIRECTOR Joseph De Grasse

AUTHOR Frederick Stowers

SCENARIO BY Bernard McConville

CAMERAMAN Chester Lyons

AS A WHOLE Fine entertainment; delightful

Charlie seen out of his usual character but is

just as pleasing STORY Gives star a change but affords him

same opportunities of which he makes the

best use DIRECTION First rate for the most part; many

individually good bits

PHOTOGRAPHY Good

LIGHTINGS Some night scenes good

CAMERA WORK All right

STAR The Same Charles Ray

SUPPORT Clara Horton Ray's leading lady this

time; others all do well

EXTERIORS Correct

INTERIORS Good

DETAIL Very good

CHARACTER OF STORY Ambitious youth

with beer pocketbook and champagne taste finds

it difficult to combat with his rich rival

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 5,744 feet

The first and most important thing about "Nineteen and Phyliss" is that Charles Ray plays the part of a young dandy instead of the awkward country boy. But even with this change Charlie is the same Charlie, and the same mannerisms peep out from under his slick regalia. He's an ambitious young fellow in the kind of a town where "dances" are the rage with the _ innger set. Charlie has two passions clothes and Phyllis and both come near ruining him.

For the most part the direction is very good. There

are one or two places where the interests threatens to slacken but generally speaking this isn't noticeable enough to worry about. Many little things, well done, are bound to meet with approval. For instance, hero Charlie has practically mortgaged his soul to buy a dress suit and in the midst of his anticipated debut in it, he drops the silk hat and his genuine fright at the headgear's near destruction is great. There is another good bit when, all dressed up, he tries to "sneak" out to the dance but his uncle is standing guard at the foot of the stairs. His various ruses to dislodge the uncle from the guard post are really funny.

When Phyllis' uncle gets inquisitive as to how much Charlie makes a week he says $18 very bodly but the scant sum is such a shock the uncle asks him to re- peat it. This time, a wiggley $18 on the screen indi- cates hero's courage is weakening. Many similar bits all register effectively.

Charlie is just a poor clerk working for $18 a week which isn't enough to even pay the war tax on the two greatest things in life for him Phyllis and "snappy" clothes. Jimmie Long, a rich fellow with a car, is also in love with Phyllis and it's this awful cir- cumstance that causes Charlie so much worry.

At a dance Charlie asks Phyllis to marry him. She says they are too young but they agree to become en- gaged. Then comes a shock. Charlie has no ring and the one Phyllis selects costs $500. He pays a deposit on it. Then hero decides to startle the town and ap- pear in a dress suit. This he does and figures he should be out of debt by 1940. In the meantime Jim- my has paid cash for the ring and intends giving it to Phyllis.

In the same meantime Charlie hits upon a way to pay his bills. All he has to do is capture the burglar who is cleaning up the town and claim $1000 reward. How Charlie accidentally lands the burglar, gets the thousand and wins the girl is for you to see.

Say the Star is a Small Town Beau Brummel in this One

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor

In announcing Ray's next attraction "Nineteen and Phyllis" be sure to tell them they're going to see him in a role a little different than those he has had most recently. Instead of his' customary country boy clothes, he's a regular "slicker"— white flannels, sport shoes, cane, n everything. You can make promises for the comedy business contained in it and tell them not to miss seeing Ray as a "dandy" in "Nineteen and Phyllis."

You can tell them it's a story of puppy love and if you want to give an idea of the story catchlines should help you out. You shouldn't have to work to get them in to see this. Mention of the star's name should be sufficient. You might say that Clara Horton plays opposite in this. Charlie's sure to make the young girls' hearts tingle when they see him dance like a regular Princeton stepper. Stills can be used advan- tageously.

Sunday, January 2, 1921

DAILY

Splendid Production and Attractive Backgrounds But Story is Weak

"TO PLEASE ONE WOMAN" Lois Weber Prod. Paramount

DIRECTOR . . . .rf Lois Weber

AUTHOR t Lois Weber

SCENARIO BY Lois Weber

CAMERAMAN William Foster

AS A WHOLE Beautiful production, artistic

backgrounds always and several pleasing per- sonalities among players STORY Deals with rather familiar type of

woman although character here is overplayed

by Mona Lisa

DIRECTION Very effective

PHOTOGRAPHY Excellent

LIGHTINGS Good

CAMERA WORK Very good

PLAYERS Claire Windsor pretty and pleasing;

Edward Burns the good looking doctor and

others all well suited

EXTERIORS Many very pretty shots

INTERIORS Some lavish

DETAIL Correct

CHARACTER OF STORY Selfish woman who

wrecks romance and is the cause of a little

boy's death

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 6,086 feet

Lois Weber is credited with the authorship of "To Please One Woman," although the screen caption ac- knowledges the idea was conceived from a story by Marion Orth. At any rate the real story of the sel- fish woman contains little very new. There are the usual familiar characters all obviously labeled as to their respective parts in the plot, but despite this, Lois Weber has made a picture attractive to the eye. The backgrounds in every scene provide splendid atmosphere and then too there are some effective touches that help make up for the story's shortcom- ings. For instance, there's the silly young girl who decides to elope with the first grown man that smiles at her and who wants to smoke cigarettes like the

Use the Producer's Name and Say

Box Office Analysis

In announcing the showing of Lois Weber's latest production "To Please One Woman," it will probably

be better to confine your promises to the production. Tell them Miss Weber has provided an attractive atmosphere for her story and that there are many beautiful backgrounds in the picture. You can talk about^the character of the sweet young girl, her ro- mance with the doctor. It might attract to mention

"selfish" woman. There's also a bit of pathos toward the end when the little boy dies as a result of the woman's whim.

Claire Windsor as the grown-up sister represents a wholesome type of girlhood, while Edith Kessler is the silly young sister. Edward Burns is the handsome young doctor and L. C. Shumway "the other man" in the case. All these players do very good work. Mona Lisa plays the part of the "selfish woman" and her acting is about the weakest thing in the picture. Her work is forced and she never misses an opportunity to take advantage of the boudoir set to display the latest in decollette.

Alice Granville is very happy in her love for Dr. Ransome, until she has reason to believe that his visits to the mansion known as the "mystery house" are other than professional. Leila, the mistress of the mansion, is the woman whom her husband cannot please and so she lives alone in the big house and having taken a fancy for the handsome youg doctor she finds it convenient to be ill quite often. The doc- tor makes his visits frequently, but it is not until after Alice refuses to have anything further to do with him that he succumbs to the "vamp."

Lucien Wainwright, another admirer of Leila, ar- rives aboard his yacht in answer to Leila's urgent tel- egram. He, however, interests himself in Alice whom he meets and although they are friendly Alice can't forget her old sweetheart. Alice's small brother Bob- bie is seriously ill as a result of running for Dr. Ran- some when Leila's phone message said she was dying and needed him at once.

. The boy dies and that same night Leila's husband arrives at the mansion and kills himself.- ^hen Leila begs Wainwright to take her away with him u't he

calmly admits that he has "lost his taste for her," whereupon, she exits from the story to parts unknown and after a time Alice and the doctor have a reconcili- ation.

the Picture is Good to Look At

for the Exhibitor

the silly little girl who wanted to smoke cigarettes like the mistress of the "mystery house."

This is Lois Weber's first release for Paramount and you can talk about her as being the most important woman director in the business. Catchlines could be used of her understanding of women and her treat- ment of a theme wherein women are concerned with a full appreciation and understanding of a woman's viewpoint.

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Fogarty: "D'ye hear about Canavan gettin' the D. S. C?"

O'Dowd: "Begobs, you're not meanin' the Distin- guished Service Cross?"

Fogarty: "No, Department of Street Cleaning."

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Tom Moore

As

Canavan, Himself

in a delightful comedy from the famous Saturday Evening Post story.

by Rupert Hughes

This character head qf Tom Moore

will make an excellent cut - out or

"window card

COI dwyn">ict ures [corporation

\jcnnpson

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J HE rapture of first- love; the agony of dis- illusion; the peace that is bred of pain— all these are blended in Betty Compson's marvelous performance of the beautiful Blanche Davis in "Prisoners of Love".

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PRISONERS OF LOVE

PRODUCED BY

BETTY COMPSON

DIRECT B ■> II V

ARTHUR ROSSON

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/HAT was the price f i Blanche Davis paid for her gift of glorious physical beauty.

Sunday, January 2, 1921

©ABL^T

Poor Direction and Slow Start Make This a Weak Offering

June Caprice & George B. Seitz in

"ROGUES AND ROMANCE"

Pathe

DIRECTOR George B. Seitz

AUTHOR George B. Seitz

SCENARIO BY George B. Seitz

CAMERAMAN Harry Wood

AS A WHOLE Very slow in getting started.

Not enough material in only moderately inter- esting sequences SSTORY Weak plot. Lots of action but noth- ing decisive occurs

DIRECTION Fair

PHOTOGRAPHY Fair

LIGHTINGS Fair

CAMERA WORK Average

STARS June Caprice looks rather attractive.

George Seitz does nothing unusual SUPPORT Marguerite Courtot makes a good

Senorita, and Harry Semels is a good villian

EXTERIORS Some good shots

INTERIORS All right

DETAIL Sub-titles insipid

CHARACTER OF STORY American saves his

sweetheart from Spanish revolutionists LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 5,827 feet

The main trouble with "Rogues and Romance," is thatsa weak plot, shy on incident, has been padded through a lot of footage to make it cover the distance for a six reel feature. The story is much too slow in getting started, and nothing particularly interesting happens until the middle of the third reel.

Material leading up to the only important happen- ing in the picture, is spread out through these two and a half reels, when it could very easily be told in

one. For that reason an audience may be pretty well discouraged by the time the action starts.

In the last half of the picture things move rapidly, and there are a couple of good hand to hand fights, and a well done skirmish between Spanish soldiers and revolutionists.

The direction, with the exception of this last scene is only fair. It would have been possible to make a much more interesting picture in spite of the fact that the material lacks, by elaborating more skillfully on the bare plot.

The players are all adequate, but Mr. Seitz and Miss Caprice do not have their ability taxed in the least. There isn't enough to either character to bring out much acting.

The action takes place in Spain, where Sylvia, an American girl, is infatuated with Pedro Pezet, a bri- gand, and leader of the Spanish revolutionists. She is engaged to Reginald Harding, an American, but when he arrives the girl breaks the engagement.

The day of the review of the troops by the governor

is chosen by Pezet as the moment for bringing the rev- olution to a head, but his plans are ruined by Car- melita, a Spanish dancing girl, who is in love with the bandit chief, and who now betrays him because of his attentions to the American girl.

Reggie unwittingly helps Pezet escape to the hills. There they find Sylvia, who claims Pezet as the man she loves, and is going to marry. Pezet takes the girl to the revolutionist headquarters, where it developes that he is merely holding her captive for ransom from her wealthy father.

Reggie follows closely, and bluffs and fights his wax- through the guards to the now penitent Sylvia. He has a single handed fight with most of the revolution- ary army, and he and Sylvia are saved in the nick of time by the Spanish soldiers.

Stars May Draw Some But Go Slow On Promises

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor

You can't afford to make any large statements about this. You can use the names of George Seitz and June Caprice to advantage, particularly if their work in serials has been popular in your neighborhood. You can also feature the fact\hat part of the picture was made in Spain, and talk about the thrills in the

fight between the revolutionists and the government soldiers.

The best thing to do, however, if you show this, is to ease it by quietly. Let the title and the names of the stars get them in.

Have You Been Seeing Selznick Pictures

Lately ?

T

HE Selznick organization lias struck its stride. It's (he talk of the trade.

Three studios in Fort Lee are working with a degree of effi- ciency seldom, if ever, before at- tained in the motion picture in- dustry.

Selznick Pictures a-plenty are be- ing produced and they're good pictures, each one better than its predecessor. They're being com- pleted on time and prints are available in the territory on the date they are promised, providing a service for exhibitors which saves them time and worry and adds greatly to their boxoffice re- ceipts.

Conway Tearle and Martha Mans- field have been added to the list of stars as worthy running mates for Elaine Hammerstein, Eugene O'Brien, and Owen Moore.

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bes- os pat orr. J ^tmf

ELAINE HAMMERSTEIN" ^FT«T»i^

WU.UAM FAVERSHAM

OWEN MOO^E

CONWAY TEARLE.

MARTHA MANSFIELD

IV e Invite Your Most Critical Inspection of:

ELAINE HAMMERSTEIN

in 4 ' Pleasure Seekers' '

EUGENE

O'BRIEN in

"Broadway & Home"

WILLIAM FAVERSHAM

in "The Sin That Was His" A Hob art Henley Production By FRANK L. PACKARD

MARTHA MANSFIELD

In Her

First Star Series Productions

{In Preparation)

OWEN MOORE

in

"The Chicken in the Case"

CONWAY

TEARLE in

"Society Snobs' '

A Hobart Henley Pro-

duction

Sunday, January 2, 1921

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DAILY

Very Weak Story and a Production That Can't Be Boasted Of

Billie Burke in

"THE FRISKY MRS. JOHNSON"

Paramount

DIRECTOR Edward Dillon

AUTHOR Clyde Fitch

SCENARIO BY Lawrence McClosky

CAMERAMAN George Folsey

AS A WHOLE Below the average of program

offering; star pleasing but she has so little to do that her appearance can't help it much

STORY Exceedingly weak material and very

little of it and that little isn't new

DIRECTION Very ordinary

PHOTOGRAPHY Good

LIGHTINGS All right

CAMERA WORK Average

STAR Greatly handicapped by lack of op- portunity

SUPPORT Go through their parts well enough

but haven't anything very much to do ; no one given credit on the screen

EXTERIORS None

INTERIORS Satisfactory studio sets

DETAIL Very little of anything else

CHARACTER OF STORY .Young widow in- curs her brother-in-law's malice in trying to pro- tect her unhappy sister, his wife

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 5,536 feet

Billie Burke's latest doesn't come up to the satisfac- tion mark of the productions being turned out by this company. In the first place the story is really worth about two reels for it certainly doesn't contain enough material for the footage accorded it. And so "The Frisky Mrs. Johnson" turns out to be a long series of scenes of which about half contain no action at all.

The action is supposedly laid in France, but there is nothing to indicate it except that the art titles con- sist of various familiar French scenes. There are no exterior shots which makes it difficult at times to

know just where the characters are and in whose home. There are two homes in which the story takes place but as the players are never seen going or com- ing, it's hard to tell just what's what.

There is one set supposed to be a street scene but everyone will know it's studio stuff. Billie Burke is pleasing in herself, but she has so little opportunity in the role of Mrs. Johnson that even her appearance doesn't help this very poor story. There is some nonsense provided by the character of a French ad- mirer of the widow who flies around getting her powder puffs, etc., but doesn't add any entertainment to the producton.

Mrs. Johnson is credited with being a frisky widow although as far as the audience is concerned, she does- n't seem to have more than an ordinary amount of "frisk." Mrs. Johnson has a married sister who is unhappy and is carrying on a love affair with Sir Lionel Heathcote, while Mrs. Johnson does her best to keep the two apart because she fears for her sis- ter's reputation.

Frank Morley, a brother of the sister's husband returns and having loved Mrs. Johnson before her marriage, it doesn't take him long to fall for her again and they plan to elope. At the same time the sister is planning to run away with Heathcote and a note sent to her is found by her husband who follows his wife to Heathcote's apartment. But in the meantime, Mrs. Johnson has heard of her sister's intention and reaches Heathcote's apartment before her brother- in-law.

Mrs. Johnson makes it appear that the note was in- tended for her and so she saves her sister, but when Frank hears of the affair he will have nothing to do with her. But eventually the sister decides that she cannot let the widow sacrifice her happiness for her so she tells her husband the truth, Frank goes back to Mrs. Johnson and the sister decides to divorce her husband and marry Heathcote.

If the Star Is Well Liked It May Get By

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor

This is a very weak one, but if Billie Burke is pop- ular with your patrons perhaps her appearance will satisfy them, although she has been provided with a very weak story in "The Frisky Mrs. Johnson." It wouldn't be well to do any promising in connection with the picture so you might confine your announce- ment to catchlines such as : ^If you had a sister who was risking her reputation would you sacrifice your

own happiness to save her?" Or, "She was called 'Frisky Mrs. Johnson' but see how she nearly lost her lover in an effort to save her sister's reputation."

Perhaps the fact that Clyde Fitch is the author may interest them so you might mention it. The support- ing- cast doesn't contain any particularly well-known names so confine your names to the star's.

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NORWICH CONli 425P DEC 17 1920

W. JENNER

HOTEL 'ASTOR NEW YORK NY

LAST OF KOHICAHS SJJASHED EVERY RECORD FOR ATTEND- ANCE FORCED TO STOP SELLING TICKETS AT EVERY PERFORMANCE CONGRATULATIONS TO ASSOCIATED PRODUCERS AND UAURICi: TOURNEUR OH THIS SPLENDID PRODUCTION

II. J. ZUCKERKAH BREED THEATRE 450P

WHHHHmmmUgHIIBiaBBBgHllWB niiiiiutwwut

MAURICE TOURNEUR

presents

COURT THEATRE

D. H BESTOW, Manager KANKAKEE, ILL.

December 19th, 1920

ttr. Sidney Goldman, c/o Associated Producers, Eric., 808 South Wabash Av., Chicago, 111.

My dear Sidney:

Just a few words in t-egard to the way in which I have put over the Maurice Tourneur prod- uction, "The Last of the Mohicans".

First allow me to thank you for writing our Superintendent of schools here and for send- ing me a copy of your letter to him. That gave me a "lead off" and if you don't think I took ad- vantage of it you should have seen my business on the opening, yesterday. Also allow me to thank you for sending me the print three days in advance so that I could get an advance showing.

When the print arrived I got busy and phoned the leaders of the following: The Ministerial Alliance, Women's Club, Y.W.C.A., Y.M.C. A. .Schools, City Officials, Board of Education, Public lib- rary and St. Vistor's College. They all responded at the private showing and when the piciture had finished I merely handed them the enclosed card which I had printed for the occasion. Within twenty four hours they all had returned their cards with THEIR OPINION written on it. That was all I needed I went from there I Heavy on the newspapers, my screen and lobby. The results were wonderful.

Friendly competitors told me to lay off of 'last of the Mohicans1", in fact I was skeptical myself but I knew from criticisms that the prod- uction was there and also know if I could get the folks interested in the education of the community brsy, that the picture would please and believe me, Sidney, that's the answer! It did please them and It pleased the kids that crave "INJUN PITCHERS" too.

Show this letter to exhibitors and they can use the same ideas and clean up the same as I have; Much success to you.

I

;

ast of the Mohicans

Jn Mexican Drama Eternal By James fenimore Gboper

Directed by MAURICE TOURNEUR and CLARENCE L.BROWN

Sunday, January 2, 1921

a!d!4

DAILY

11

Really Pleasing Picture With Carey in a Role Out of the Ordinary

Harry Carey in "HEARTS UP"

Universal

DIRECTOR Val Paul

AUTHOR Harry Carey

SCENARIO BY Val Paul

CAMERAMAN H. Fowler

AS A WHOLE Thoroughly satisfactory pro- gram picture ; clean cut production and a

smooth continuity obvious STORY Pleasing human interest theme gives

star the sort of material that suits him best DIRECTION Very good all the way; several

good effects

PHOTOGRAPHY Very good

LIGHTINGS Clear

CAMERA WORK Well judged

STAR Has less of the cowboy spirit in this

SUPPORT Migonne Golden a pleasing little

lady; others good

EXTERIORS Good

INTERIORS Look like the real thing

DETAIL All right

CHARACTER OF STORY Bachelor ranch

owner suddenly finds himself playing father to

a girl he loves

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 4,782 feet

In "Hearts Up," Harry Carey's latest Universal pro- duction, the cowboy star is seen in a role with less of the cowboy trimmins' and for the sake of variety alone, the offering is a pleasing diversion from the type of picture in which this star is usually seen. Carey is credited with writing the story so it must be that he doesn't aim to confine his efforts altogether to the sombrero and saddle.

The story has a real human interest appeal and the production end of it has been really well taken care of

by Val Paul, who has injected many very fine touches. Some scenes taken aboard a moving train are good and there's a splendid fire scene. In this bit there is a very effective bit of photography in the way of a double exposure. Carey has just rescued from the burning building, a man who had once saved his life. The double exposure shows the man saving Carey from drowning.

There is just one thing that may be criticised and that is the fact that it isn't quite comprehensive that a man as old as the hero is supposed to be, would be in love with a child such as played by Mignonne Golden. The lady is pleasing but a little older looking girl would have made Carey's falling in love much more plausible.

Jim Drew, a squaw man, receives word that his wife whom he had long before deserted, has died and that his daughter is coming to live with him. But before the girl arrives Drew is injured when his cabin is burned and dies just as David Brent (Carey), ar- rives to pay back a debt of gratitude. He has the girl's letter saying she. will meet her father in San Francisco.

Thinking to repay his dead friend, Brent decides to meet the girl and tell her her father is dead. But Lorelei believes Carey is her father and she is so happy with her beautiful home and the kindness of Brent, that he can't bring himself to tell her the truth. On the train Lorelei had met Gordon Swayne, a sur- veyor, whose friendship she retains and Brent, real- izing he loves Lorelei is unhappy.

Eventually Gordon learns that Brent is not Lorelei's father and he threatens the ranchman , Finally when Lorelei learns the truth Brent decides to go away and leave the girl mistress of his home. Lorelei stops him and tells him she loves him only.

Should Give General Satisfaction Especially to Carey Fans

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor

If you have Harry Carey fans among your clientele be sure to get this for them. It shows the star in a role somewhat different from that in which they are accustomed to seeing him and it gives him a chance to show what he can do minus the sombrero and other cowboy paraphenalia. You can talk about the human interest theme, tell them hcty the star plays "Daddy" to a little girl although he loves her as a woman.

Say that Carey also wrote the story. That should interest them. Val Paul deserves mention for his splendid direction and you can link up the title with catchlines effectively. "If a little orphan girl was happy in the thought that you were her father, would you tell her the truth?" Or, "She loved him as a father, but he loved her as a woman. See how it worked out in 'Hearts Up,' Harry Carey's latest Un- iversal production."

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GEORGE ARCHAINBAUD

DIRECTOR

u

The Pleasure Seekers"

with Elaine Hammerstein General Release December 30

Now in Production "The Girl from Nowhere"

with Elaine Hammerstein

Sunday, January 2, 1921

tMA

DAILY

13

Star Puts Over Ordinary Material Which Lacks Originality

Buck Jones in

"TWO MOONS"

Fox

DIRECTOR Edward J. LaSaint

AUTHOR Robert Welles Ritchie

SCENARIO BY Edward J. LeSaint

CAMERAMAN Friend F. Baker

AS A WHOLE Typical Western, makes fairly

good entertainment but lacks originality STORY Ordinary frontier characterizations,

with a few unusual touches. Gets over, but

not big DIRECTION Good Western atmosphere, fight

scenes well handled

PHOTOGRAPHY Satisfactory

LIGHTINGS Clear

CAMERA WORK . . . All right

STAR A likeable personality, nothing unusual

required of him SUPPORT Carol Holloway gives a very enjoy- able performance as the sheep herder's daughter.

Balance of cast adequate

EXTERIORS Good Western stuff

INTERIORS All right

DETAIL Fair

CHARACTER OF STORY Cowboy captures

cattle rustler and wins girl who thought she

hated him

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION About 5,000 feet

Buck Jones makes a good type of cowboy hero, and his personality and the work of Carol Holloway as the fiery little mountain girl, put over an otherwise very ordinary western. There is plenty of gunplay by everyone in the cast, and that's what most West- ern fans want. The story in its main plot is the

regulation theme of the good Westerner who defeats all the bad Westerners, but some unusual twists have been given here and there which help for some originality.

It has been well directed, the fight scenes, both fist and gun, being especially good. The action is fast and runs smoothly, and on the whole it makes very fair entertainment for lovers of Westerns. The scenes between Bill Blunt and Hilma are especially good, and Carol Holloway does an intelligent and spirited char- acterization of Hilma.

The story is laid in the time when the cattlemen and the sheep herders of the West were continually at swords- points, for control of the grazing lands. Bill Blunt (Buck Jones), on a tour of inspection for the cattlemen whose interests he protects, finds some steers in the corral of Old Man Ring, a sheep herder. Hilma Ring, his«daughter hates everything pertaining to cattle, and tries to shoot Bill. Old man Ring is murdered by the mysterious "Killer," thought to be employed by the cattlemen. Zang Whistler then tries to carry off Hilma. Bill appears on the scene to arrest Zang for cattle rustling, and Zang and Hilma escape after wounding Bill. The "Killer" is cap- tured and brought to jail by Zang and Hilma, where he confesses that he was employed by the cattlemen to clean out the sheep herders. The sheep men storm the jail for the killer, and the cattlemen for Zang. The latter and Hilma escape but are pursued and cap- tured by Bill. Barricaded in a cabin Bill holds out against the whole gang of cattle rustlers, and when he is wounded Hilma rushes to his aid. Zang drags her to the door but she breaks away, barricades her- 'self inside and soon discovers that she is in love with Bill, whom she had hated and attempted to kill.

Boost the Star and Promise Them Lots of Shooting

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor

The best bet on this one is to appeal strongly to the lovers of biff-bang gun play. You can promise them as much of that as you wish. If Buck Jones is pop- ular with your patrons you can assure them a good performance by the star. If you talk about the story, play up the feature of theynysterious "Killer" who terrorized the district with his murders. Also tell

them it is the story of the taming of a fiery little Western "shrew." Your best points are the star and the thrills, because of the lack of originality in the theme. If you want catch lines you can say: "See how the girl tried to kill Bill Blunt, and then married him, in 'Two Moons.' "

14

jM^c

DAILY

Sunday, January 2, 1921

Adaptation of French Play Provides Entertaining Farce

Wanda Hawley in

"HER BELOVED VILLAIN"

Realart

DIRECTOR Sam Wood

AUTHOR Alexandre Bisson & Albert Carre

SCENARIO BY Alice Eyton

CAMERAMAN Alfred Gilks

AS A WHOLE Good entertainment, lively com- edy, well produced

STORY Clean farce, with situations coherently

developed, and interest sustained by sufficiently fast action

DIRECTION Beginning might move swifter,

rest adequate

PHOTOGRAPHY Fair

LIGHTINGS Fair

CAMERA WORK Satisfactory

STAR Attractive and pleasing. Comedy work

overshadowed by support SUPPORT Tully Marshall carries off comedy

honors

EXTERIORS Few of them

INTERIORS All right

DETAIL Satisfactory

CHARACTER OF STORY Man decieves girl's

suitor in order to marry her himself, then has

trouble explaining the deceit LENGTH OF PRODUCTION. 4,646 feet

In "Her Beloved Villian," Wanda Hawley has been given an adaptation of the French play "La Veglione," by Bisson and Carre, and while the production pro- vides good entertainment, it is not overly due to the work of the star. The picture starts out as straight drama, but quickly assumes all the ear marks of a farce. It is an amusing farce too, with enough variation

from the standard one or two plots common to this type of picture, to make the theme novel. Although Miss Hawley offers one or two bits of real comedy, she is somewhat thrust into the background by Tully Marshall, who easily dominates the piece, with a very amusing performance. The director has pretty well exhausted the comedy of the original, developing each situation to the fullest extent. The balance of the cast including, Templer Powell, Ramsey Wallace, and Lillian Leighton, all fit in well.

The scene of the story is laid in France. Louis Martinot is in love with Susanne Bergomat (Wanda Hawley), and upon being hastily summoned to America, requests his friend Dr. Blythe, to investigate her family, and report. Blythe, falling in love with the girl himself, reports that her father is a drunkard and her mother a cabaret singer ; and then marries her himself. Martinot appears sometime later, ignorant of Blythe's marriage, and Blythe is at a loss as to how he can keep his wife and Martinot apart. Blythe per- suades his partner, Dr. Poulard (Tully Marshall), to take Susanne to her mother in a neighboring town. Instead of going home Susanne drags the erstwhile staid doctor to the carnival at Nice, where he shows his first excessive liking for champagne. Their ar- rival home the next morning discloses the